In the 1920s in Argentina, Antonio Nores Martinez started breeding a dog intended to not only be a pet and family guardian, but also a hunting dog capable of taking on big game such as wild boar and cougars.
Martinez picked the Cordoba Fighting Dog to be the base for the breed. This breed is extinct today but was described as a large and ferocious dog that was both a great hunter and fighter. He crossed it with Great Dane, Boxer, Spanish Mastiff, Old English Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Great Pyrenees, Pointer, Irish Wolfhound and Dogue de Bordeaux. Martinez kept improving the resulting breed via selective breeding to introduce the desired traits. The first standard for the Dogo Argentino was written in 1928.

Dogos are used to hunt wild boar, also called jabali. These wild boar can weigh anywhere between 400 and 450 lbs, but can reach weights of 600 lbs. The boars are problematic because they destroy crops and orchards, kill livestock (such as calves and lamb), and are so aggressive that they often kill farmers and peasants. Not only are they extremely aggressive, they are also very fast and powerful, making them extremely difficult to hunt and kill. In Argentina, large packs of Argentine Dogos are used to track, take down, and kill wild boars. This traditional style of hunting, called monteria criolla, originated in the time of the European aristocracy and involves the Dogos tacking, chasing and catching the boar followed by the hunters killing the boar with a large knife.

THE BREEDS IN DOGO ARGENTINO
1) the Fighting Dog of Cordoba, to which he added blood from.
2) the Pointer to give him a keen sense of smell which would be essential for the hunt.
3) The Boxer added vivacity and gentleness.
4) the Great Dane it's size.
5) the Bull Terrier, fearlessness.
6) the Bulldog gave it an ample chest and boldness
7) the Irish Wolfhound brought it's instinct as a hunter of wild game.
8) the Dogue de Bordeaux contributed it's powerful jaws.
9) the Great Pyrenees it's white coat.
10) the Spanish Mastiff gave it's quota of power.

This breed has its origin in the province of Cordoba, in the central (Mediterranean) region of the Republic of Argentina. Its creator was Dr. Antonio Nores Martinez, a (renowned) doctor and member of a traditional local family. In 1928, his passion for dogs, perhaps a family legacy, led him to set the bases and a standard for a new dog breed which he named Dogo Argentino. His work was based upon the methodical crossbreeding of several pure breeds with the " old fighting dog from Cordoba ", a dog which was very strong and vigorous but lacked psychic and genetic stability. This local breed had been the product of the crossbreeding among Mastiffs, Bulldogs and Bull Terriers and was widely known and appreciated by fervent dogfight fans, a very popular activity at the time which embraced all social classes. After a thorough and minute character study and selection, through different generations, Dr. Nores Martinez accomplished his purpose, obtaining the first " family ". At the beginning it was generally considered a dog for fighting but Dr. Nores Martinez's liking for hunting led him to take the dog to one of his habitual hunting trips, where the new breed demonstrated its skills, thus becoming a key figure in all his trips. This it became quickly an excellent " big-game hunting dog ".

With the passing of time, this adaptating capacity has made this dog very versatile as regards functions; it has proved to be a noble companion and a loyal and insurmountable protector of those it loves. Its strength, tenacity, sharp sense of smell and bravery make it the best dog among those used for hunting wild boars, peccaries, pumas and other country predators which can be found in the vast and heterogeneous areas of the Argentinean territory. With the passing of time, this adaptating capacity has made this dog very versatile as regards functions;it has proved to be a noble companion and a loyal and insurmountable protector of those it loves. Its strength, tenacity, sharp sense of smell and bravery make it the best dog among those used for hunting wild boars, peccaries, pumas and other country predators which can be found in the vast and heterogeneous areas of the Argentinean territory

From the book El Perro Dogo Argentino -The history of the Dogo Argentino
Agustin Nores Martinez - Translated in may 1996 by Marcelo Ignacio Fernández

The year was 1925. My brother Antonioo and I had yet reach our eighteenth birthday (he was a year older then me), and by that time we were both absorbed by a true passion for dogs of all breeds, passion wich was to remain constant thorough our entire lives, since so it was, till his untimely death, and so it will be, God willing, till the upcoming of my own. I have expressed to my own people my last will, wichh is to die with a Dogo Argentino under my bed, having my grave, where my bones will lie, in the solitude of the Andes, covered just with a rough cross, and the vigilant figure of a Dogo guarding my sleep. They have shares with me every instant of my troubled life, and it is my desire that the accompany me in my final resting place.
That passion we had since childhood took us to translate, dictionary in hand, the book Notre Ami Le Chien, that wonderful source of dogbreeding knowledge to which we must all resort when we want to learn about the orrigins of any European breed; literary wonder which my father had in his bookcase and I keep as a precious and inherited treasure among the many hundreds of books related to the topic that I still have and consult. More or less at that time we started translating from English, specially the hunting and working breeds we were intrested in from the Hutchinson Dog Encyclopedia, which was also in my ftaers libary, among hundreds of medicine books which he, as a suregon and university professor, study continuously.
Our love for dogs was so great that during the summers, in Santa Isabel, our villa, we managed to borrow, feed and heal the appallingly skinny dogs from workers who went to harvest the crops throughout the region. During those months we dedicated ourselves to healing the animals wounds, cleaning them out of bugs, fattening them and at the end of season, when their masters returned from the harvest, we gave them back their dogs in such a fine condition they, had they dad a pedigree of any king, they could have been exhibited in a dog show.


Source´s from books Todo Acerca del Dogo Argentino, El Perro Dogo Argentino and more.